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Life is tragic simply because the earth turns and the sun inexorably rises and sets, and one day, for each of us, the sun will go down for the last, last time. Perhaps the whole root of our trouble, the human trouble, is that we will sacrifice all the beauty of our lives, will imprison ourselves in totems, taboos, crosses, blood sacrifices, steeples, mosques, races, armies, flags, nations, in order to deny the fact of death, which is the only fact we have. It seems to me that one ought to rejoice in the fact of death—ought to decide, indeed, to earn one’s death by confronting with passion the conundrum of life. One is responsible to life: It is the small beacon in that terrifying darkness from which we come and to which we shall return. One must negotiate this passage as nobly as possible, for the sake of those who are coming after us.

- James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (via et—cetera)

leseanthomas:

The Boondocks creator Aaron McGruder returns with an all-new TV series to premiere on Adult Swim August 7th, Black Jesus.

All hell is sure to break loose.

(Source: king-dinosaur)

petetoms:

This is how I would wrap up the TWO WEEKS NOTICE trilogy: 
2 WEEKS 2 NOTICE: Sandra Bullock is in a zany but horrifying accident and has to have experimental surgery that leaves her essentially just a head. As she recovers,  she slowly realizes Hugh Grant has tricked her into working for him again. Can she escape his employ for a second time? Without the use of her body? Meanwhile, the snakes that live inside of Hugh Grant and operate him like a human skin puppet aren’t getting along. Can they put their differences aside long enough to save their business? Directed by Jennifer Lynch (Boxing Helena).
2WN: TOKYO DRIFT: Hugh Grant is kidnapped by a rival corporation while doing business in Japan. Sandra Bullock gets a second experimental surgery to become a car in order to rescue him. Can she do it before the kidnapper’s two week deadline is up? Bullock shines in a performance where she mostly communicates to the audience in honks and flashing headlights.
Spinoff:
TWO WEEKS NOTICE ORIGINS: (ROBERT KLEIN’S CHARACTER’S NAME): In an experimental mix of documentary and narrative film, Robert Klein is horrified to discover those 200 HBO specials he’s done were actually televised.

petetoms:

This is how I would wrap up the TWO WEEKS NOTICE trilogy: 

2 WEEKS 2 NOTICE: Sandra Bullock is in a zany but horrifying accident and has to have experimental surgery that leaves her essentially just a head. As she recovers,  she slowly realizes Hugh Grant has tricked her into working for him again. Can she escape his employ for a second time? Without the use of her body? Meanwhile, the snakes that live inside of Hugh Grant and operate him like a human skin puppet aren’t getting along. Can they put their differences aside long enough to save their business? Directed by Jennifer Lynch (Boxing Helena).

2WN: TOKYO DRIFT: Hugh Grant is kidnapped by a rival corporation while doing business in Japan. Sandra Bullock gets a second experimental surgery to become a car in order to rescue him. Can she do it before the kidnapper’s two week deadline is up? Bullock shines in a performance where she mostly communicates to the audience in honks and flashing headlights.

Spinoff:

TWO WEEKS NOTICE ORIGINS: (ROBERT KLEIN’S CHARACTER’S NAME): In an experimental mix of documentary and narrative film, Robert Klein is horrified to discover those 200 HBO specials he’s done were actually televised.

http://filmantidote.tumblr.com/post/92177793442/kamustakanamare-white-feminist-science

kamustakanamare:



White Feminist Science Fiction as Cinéma Verité, or what else is fuckin’ new: vulnerable white girl aesthetically brutalized at the hands of stock character Asian crime mobsters (apparently in Taipei, but the boss seems to be played by Choi Min-sik,…

"One of the things that was great for David Byrne when we did Stop Making Sense was that David really got to design the lighting for the show—and by extension for the movie. He hadn’t got to do everything he wanted to do lighting wise with the stage show because of the limitations of technology at that point. But David got a chance to work with Jordan Cronenweth who shot Blade Runner and was a great master of American cinematography, and he could do all the little tweakings and brushstrokes that he had dreamed of doing with the stage show. […] It’s great working with [Cronenweth] because he’s an absolute tight-ass perfectionist. You can’t get Jordan to back away from anything he’s doing until he’s got it perfect, and that can be exasperating because you’ve got one eye on the clock and you’re desperate to get moving. But then when you see the dailies and you see the extra level Jordan was taking it to when he was driving you nuts, you go, ‘Thank God he did it.’ He’s a painstaking artist.”

"I’d just as soon it didn’t occur to people that they’re watching a concert, but rather a band performing without the distancing factor of it being an event that happened once. That’s why there’s no audience in the film until the very end. I thought it was important if the film was to be as effective for filmgoers as it was for me watching the concert. I wanted to capture the energy and the flow and that unrelenting progression of music."

"We were minutely prepared. David had storyboarded the concert in a series of close shots. Not for the film, but for a tour. From this storyboard, I started to develop a model of the film, which by the way never stopped being modified. I worked closely with my visual advisor Sandy McLeod, who made sure I was in constant contact with the Talking Heads while they were on tour. I traveled with them myself for one week in Texas, then, before our concert, I followed all their performances on the West Coast. So on D-Day, I had a precise idea about the best camera placements. Having said that, 50 percent of the shots were conceived on the spot. […] This was the first multiple-camera situation I’d ever been in. The first night was pretty disastrous. Suddenly it was all happening, and all the preparation and planning was put up against the reality of the show. Cameras ran out of film, the band was real nervous and uptight having cameras stuck in their faces. We kept getting each other in the background of shots too much. It was a mess, but a superb camera rehearsal. The next three nights were spectacular." — Jonathan Demme on Stop Making Sense

(Source: strangewood)

IT HAPPENED AGAIN.. this time i wasnt even mad lmao im used to it.. #Wow #SheThinkImStealingPart2

(Source: vine.co)

ilanawexler:

Meet Lincoln (x)

coldkevin:

One of the best out takes from any television show, ever. 

HAHA

(Source: prekrasnoe-mngnovenie)

2299comic:

THE FUTURE IS NOW. 11 stories. 82 pages. $2.
Available now on Gumroad.
It’s here.

2299comic:

THE FUTURE IS NOW. 11 stories. 82 pages. $2.

Available now on Gumroad.

It’s here.
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